Historically Speaking

Making sense of it all!

It’s In A Wewoka Switch

Posted by Elyse Bruce on June 24, 2010

Wewoka is a small town in Oklahoma and situated at the junction of State Highway 56 and U.S. Highway 270.  The town was originally located in 1849 in what was considered to be the Seminole Nation, Indian Territory (I.T.).   After the U.S. Civil War, Elijah J. Brown, was selected by the U.S. government to lead Seminole refugees from Kansas to the Seminole Nation, Indian Territory.

Not too much later, in 1895, the Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad (the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway after 1902) ran its line from McAlester to Oklahoma City, passing through Wewoka.  They also installed side tracks.

In the early 1900s, freight would oftentimes go missing once a train had been redirected to the side tracks, and items that went missing were said to be “lost in the Wewoka Switch.”

In the 1920s, when thousands of freight shipments destined elsewhere went missing, they were soon found hidden at the Wewoka Switch.  Soon, the railroad company made it a policy to check Wewoka first whenever they were advised of a lost shipment.   It got to be such a habit that soon a rubber stamp was created that read: “Search Wewoka Switch.”

It didn’t take too long before the saying became: “It’s in a Wewoka Switch” meaning that whatever or whoever was involved in questionable — possibly illegal — activities was quite obviously tangled up in a tight spot.

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2 Responses to “It’s In A Wewoka Switch”

  1. Clem said

    Back in the 1940’s there was a speed trap that used catch people passing through town After you were fined you would tell your friend “I got caught in the Wewoka Switch”

    • Welcome to the Idiomation blog, and t hanks for sharing that information, Clem. There’s nothing we like better at Idiomation than reading the personal add-ons that people who visit the blog site share. We appreciate your contribution, and we look forward to seeing you back here soon.

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